EVRAZ operations in North America disrupted by Ryuk ransomware

Security Affairs

Computer systems at EVRAZ, a multinational vertically integrated steel making and mining company, have been hit by Ryuk ransomware. EVRAZ is one of the world’s largest multinational vertically integrated steel making and mining companies with headquarters in London.

The City of Durham shut down its network after Ryuk Ransomware attack

Security Affairs

The City of Durham, North Carolina, was the last victim in order of time of the infamous Ryuk ransomware that infected its systems. The City of Durham, North Carolina was forced to shut down its network after its systems have been infected with the Ryuk Ransomware during the weekend.

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Security Affairs newsletter Round 264

Security Affairs

A new round of the weekly SecurityAffairs newsletter arrived! Every week the best security articles from Security Affairs free for you in your email box.

MY TAKE: Why DDoS weapons will proliferate with the expansion of IoT and the coming of 5G

The Last Watchdog

This attacker easily located IoT devices that used the manufacturers’ default security setting. They are also extending their malicious activities beyond DDoS attacks to also spread ransomware, crypto mine and burrow deep into large enterprises. A couple of high-profile distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks will surely go down in history as watershed events – each for different reasons. Related: IoT botnets now available for economical DDoS blasts.

IoT 209

Too Much Holiday Cheer? Here’s Something to Fear: Cybersecurity Predictions for 2020

Adam Levin

Ransomware will continue to thrive. As long as humans are well……human, phishing attacks will lead to ransomware infecting more and more networks, and businesses, municipalities and other organizations will continue to pay whatever they must in order to regain control of their data and systems. Unfortunately, many are not secure because they are protected by nothing more than manufacturer default passwords readily available online.

Weekly podcast: 2018 end-of-year roundup

IT Governance

The year started with the revelation of Spectre and Meltdown – major security flaws affecting processors manufactured by Intel, ARM and AMD. Rather than dropping ransomware on victims’ machines and hoping they would pay to regain access to their files, cyber criminals were increasingly cutting out the middle man and infecting victims’ machines with software that used their spare processing power to mine for cryptocurrency.